Major To Relative Minor Scale Converter

(Works Both Ways!)

How to use the tool to find relative minor/major scales:

  • Type any major or natural minor scale.
  • Click “convert”
  • Get answer.

A cool way to help you memorize relative scales is by gamefying it.

Here’s how:

  • Type any natural minor or major scale.
  • Before you click the convert button, try to calculate the corresponding relative scale in your mind.
  • Click “convert” to check if you’re right.
  • Repeat it over and over until you can answer it correctly right away.

You can also use the help of a friend or a family member to test you.

If this tool helps you with this, please share it.

Pro advice:

We distinguish between the terms keys and scales.

These two do not mean the same thing.

The difference between a key to a scale is that a scale is a specific sequence of musical notes with fixed intervals between them, while a key is the tonal center or home note of a piece of music, often but not always determined by the scale used.

The key provides a sense of stability, and scales are the building blocks for expressing melodies and harmonies within that key.

For example, in the Key of A minor, you can sometimes use A natural minor, A harmonic minor, or A melodic minor.

Do you understand the difference? One key, three scales.

To enhance your learning about relative minor and major keys and scales you can also download our relative keys chart so you can repeat it until it sits well in your mind. 

This is how the relative keys chart looks:

relative minor and major keys chart

FAQs About Minor and Major Relatives

Question: How to find a relative major from a minor?

Answer: A relative major scale is found a minor third (three half-steps or semitones) above the minor scale.

Examples for finding relative major scales:

The relative major of d minor is F major (count three half-steps from D-to-D#-to E and another half-step to F).

Always include your starting point which in this example is D, when you count.

Another example:

The relative major of e minor is G major, count: E (minor), F, F#, and G (major).

Now, see if you can figure out why the next scales are relatives (and for your own good, start memorizing them):

  • The relative major of B minor is D major.
  • The relative major of F minor is A major.
  • The relative major of A minor is C major.
  • The relative major of C minor is Eb major.
  • The relative major of G minor is Bb major.

Question: What is the trick for finding relative minor fast?

Answer: Count six notes from the major scale’s root note and you’ll get its relative minor scale.

The easiest way to count and make sure you’re not wrong is counting with your fingers.

Pro tip:

Always make sure you have four and a half whole steps between your root and your target relative minor.

For example, if you want to find the relative minor of c major then c is your first note, your starting point, your root note, your tonic:

1

2

3

4

5

6

C (major)

D

E

F

G

A (minor)

Whole

Whole

Half

Whole

Whole

Total: 4.5 whole steps

Another example, G major’s relative minor is E minor, like this:

1

2

3

4

5

6

G (major)

A

B

C

D

E (minor)

Whole

Whole

Half

Whole

Whole

Total: 4.5 whole steps

Question: what happens if the major scale contains sharps like C# for instance?

Answer: as long as you get to the sixth note from the root note and keep a total of 4.5 whole steps between the two relatives, the scale you’ll get will be correct.

Like this:

1

2

3

4

5

6

C# (major)

D#

E#

F#

G#

A# (minor)

Whole

Whole

Half

Whole

Whole

Total: 4.5 whole steps

Tips for More Proficiency in Relative Minor and Major Scales

If the major scale contains any sharps, the relative minor will also contain them

(Assuming you’re working with the standard circle of fifths).

For example:

C major’s relative minor is A minor, and C# major’s relative minor is  A# minor.

That’s not the case for minor scales…

For example the relative major of C# minor is E major, and the relative major of G# minor is B major.

Deeper Expansion of Your Understanding…

Parallel Minor VS Relative Minor:

The relative minor is a minor scale sharing the same key signature as its major counterpart and starting on its sixth degree (e.g., F# minor in relation to A major).

The parallel minor is a minor scale with the same tonic but a distinct key signature from its major counterpart (e.g., C minor in relation to C major).

Relative Minor and Major Scales Conclusion

Sometimes we need a fast answer regarding which is the relative minor of major or vice versa.
For this, and to help you memorize relative scales, this converter was designed.

The best advice I can give you is to remember how to find minor and major relatives by yourself and to memorize them by heart.

So, to conclude, here’s a summary of what we discussed:

To find the relative minor key quickly, count six scale tones from the major tonic and you’ll get the relative minor scale. C major, D, E, F, G, and A minor, for example.

If your tonic is minor, count up a minor third (three half-steps) and you’ll get the relative Major scale. Cm, C#, D, Eb major for example.

Natural minor (also called Aeolian mode) means that the minor scale is not harmonic nor melodic minor i.e. no changes have been made to the basic natural minor’s formula: 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7.

Relative minor differs from parallel minor.